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    fix warped PLA prints

    You can fix those warped prints! PLA plastic starts to get soft at 180 degrees Fahrenheit. Get a pan of water up to a good boil. Pour a second bowl of cold water.
    Stick the warped end of the print into the boiling water for between two and thirty seconds (depends on the thickness).
    It will be limp but not lose a lot of detail. Straighten out the warped bit and immerse in cold water.
    Easy peasy.

    #2
    I did something similar in my oven at 75 deg C. Water sounds a bit better as the temp is easier to control. I will try it next time I need to do something like that

    Comment


      #3
      Good tip! Thanks for sharing. This is a much safer and easier method than rotating a print over the open flame of my gas range to soften it.

      Comment


        #4
        I feel like this is one of those why-didn't-I-think-of-that moments. Thank you very much for the tip!

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          #5
          what about this?
          Why am I getting ABS corner lift with PLA?
          I am printing this with PLA 200 degrees nozzle 60 degrees bed 0.2 layer

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            #6
            Originally posted by sdtag
            what about this?
            Why am I getting ABS corner lift with PLA?
            I am printing this with PLA 200 degrees nozzle 60 degrees bed 0.2 layer
            Are you printing a brim? I can't tell from the photo but it looks like you're not. Try adding 2 or 3 brim layers to keep it from curling up like that

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              #7
              no I didn't
              I tried a 3 brim layer and it didn't really help.
              maybe 10?
              I have lots of experience with ABS but I am relatively new to PLA. I didn't think this happened with PLA.
              It must be a temperature differential thing right?
              With ABS I used to add round corner pads to the corners and it would help.
              I guess I'll try it here too with PLA.
              And maybe turn off the heated bed after the first few layers are down?

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by sdtag
                no I didn't
                I tried a 3 brim layer and it didn't really help.
                maybe 10?
                I have lots of experience with ABS but I am relatively new to PLA. I didn't think this happened with PLA.
                It must be a temperature differential thing right?
                With ABS I used to add round corner pads to the corners and it would help.
                I guess I'll try it here too with PLA.
                And maybe turn off the heated bed after the first few layers are down?
                I run 3 brim layers and similar temp settings to yours and haven't experienced curling like that. I started printing on the masking tape that came with my A8 but that worked too well and tore up when I printed a large item. I switched to green frog tape and scuffed the surface and it works perfect--print sticks great while printing but releases easily enough. Not sure what you're printing on but maybe you're just not getting good adhesion in general.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Pretty much any thermoplastic is going to fight you when you print a large thin sheet. The suggestions on here about adhesion are very good recommendations to help you print that particular model and ones like it.

                  Something I'd like to suggest is that if you ever design a model that needs to be large such as that and you get a little more freedom of design (that looks like a circuit cover so I understand what you are going for) I'd suggest trying to keep the printing process in your mind as you design. If you were to edit that particular model to make it less likely to warp, you could add channels that break up the bottom layer. Think if you had a grill top and you heated it up and pushed that print onto it a little, creating these round slight depressions into its bottom, turning it 35-90 degrees and doing it again. You'd have an enclosed box on the bottom like you'd want, but the surface would be broken up. As it would print you'd see the beginnings of the print be sections of diamonds or squares on the bed, growing as the layers build up, until they're connected. The separation between smaller pieces allows the flexing of the thermoplastic to be broken up and minimized helping a large flat shape print without curling edges. The reason why large sheets curl so much is the entire layer is connected and trying to shrink towards the center. Each layer printed will just keep trying to pull towards its center till you stop printing those sheets. Breaking it up like I described will allow the stretching to be isolated to each section that is printed and shouldn't effect the print quality as much, if at all.

                  Again I understand why you have that model the way it is and your printer is definitely capable of doing it, but the adhesion methods and things like brims and corner circles will be needed as it looks like you've gathered. So keep up the good work.

                  Hope this helps.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    that does help actually. Thank you.
                    I will keep the outside part of it solid, but the flat bottom part will be segmented, I get it, the less plastic in one long continuous piece the less force to shrink back. That totally makes sense.
                    But I want to leave the outside alone so it gives the illusion of a solid flat bottom.
                    I don't know if this will help me or hurt me but I think I may have been too cool on the nozzle. I bumped it up to 210 and everything looks better. Still has corner lift but better.I'll try the segmented approach. thanks for that. great description btw, haha lay my print on a bbq grill, haha but it really illustrated your point.
                    So of course I have questions... like how far up should indentations go? Is there a formula? If my part is 140mm X 56mm how many and how deep? I'm guessing about 1mm deep, if I print at 0.2 layer, then 5 layers. Sound about right? This will be all trial and error won't it? Do I need them to run the full length? In other words do I need them in the middle also, or concentrate on the ends and corners? I print on a build sheet btw, I HATE glue and hair spray.
                    sorry for rambling but I think you pointed me in the right direction

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Haha you're definitely asking the right questions. In an attempt to find the original article that I learned this from I found a newer one that showcased a couple of different methods to mitigation warping. The only one being purely of designing for it was to have a rounded footprint. The writer included a print sample showing that rounding the corners stopped warping substantially. It makes me wonder if maybe putting a single line of indentation near each corner at a 45 degree angle and rounding the edges of the remaining center piece might not help.

                      Your questions of what exactly would work best is making me want to start designing proof tests to find out if there's some kind of golden rule or at least a real safe guideline to be had. From what I've seen the majority of warp prevention in design is usually done by making holes in things above the first layers to keep the whole part from warping, but I don't see why the same method can't be used for the bottom of the part as well.

                      If you do start testing different designs to accomplish this, do let us know. I really think that aesthetic has a huge part to play though, as the fit and finish can be very important. I wonder if making a structure just onto of a thin base layer might work too.

                      Haha if only I had my printer with me now.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        last night I tried an experiment.
                        I took the lid to the box I was trying to print and worked on it.
                        The lid prints upside down, so whatever I put on the face will be very visible. So I made a design.
                        I started with a cube, 10x10x10. I added a hole to it, 9x9x12 and centered and grouped them. I use Tinkercad btw.
                        Then I converted my shape to a hole. I duplicated it 5 times to make a row, then I duplicated the row 13 times to cover the lid with this pattern. I centered and grouped them. I pushed the square holes into the lid 1mm.
                        My hole lines were too thin and/or too close together, but it worked. I had slight lifting still in one corner but what an improvement. I see results and feel like I am on my way. Thanks again for your help with this. I never knew PLA did this. I thought it was an ABS thing, one of my reasons for even trying PLA. haha

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Haha I'm glad it worked. Oh what a joy it is to come up with an idea to design and getting the ability to try it out on your very own printer. Kind of showcases what brought us all here to the 3D printing realm in the first place, no?

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I have recently started using PETG instead of PLA and that has provided me with two big benefits :

                            1) PETG is much less susceptible to curling than PLA.

                            2) PETG sticks nicely to a glass plate without any additional gumf.

                            It also prints at a higher temperature than PLA so is a bit more tolerant to long term stability - one of the issues of PLA is that it can deform at normal temperature - and it will be unusable if exposed to sunlight through a window etc.

                            Unless you have a compelling reason for using PLA then it might be worth switching to PETG.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Thanks for the tip. I've been thinking about getting some more materials to test out and maybe add to the hub.

                              Comment


                                #16
                                You might want to try PETG rather than PLA. Some of the salient features of PETG include the following in no particular order:

                                * PETG doesn't warp as readily as ABS and PLA.
                                * Higher temperature extrusion so less susceptible to deformation in a hot climate.
                                * Sticks nicely to a glass plate and doesn't need any help with other materials to hold it down.
                                * Lowish bed temperature - I use 60 degrees.
                                * PETG is believed to be stronger than ABS and PLA.

                                I only recently started using PETG and I'm a very happy bunny. I had previously been an ABS holic but having spent time getting my printing parameters sorted I won't be going back. The only positive in favour of ABS is that it pops off the bed when it cools, but as I had to heat the bed to 110 degrees before printing I can live with needing a bit more effort getting the PETG object off the bed. And it comes off clean without needing any work to finish off.

                                Comment


                                  #17
                                  I have been having a problem posting here lately so I hope this goes....
                                  I am down to 3 squares in each corner and it is coming out nice and flat.
                                  I have been thinking about PETG too. I think I'll try some

                                  Comment


                                    #18
                                    I keep getting an en-cryptic pop up error window telling me something I don't understand.

                                    Comment


                                    • Admin
                                      Admin commented
                                      Editing a comment
                                      Please let me know if you detect the error again. Thanks sdtag!

                                    #19
                                    Originally posted by jsprenkle@gmail.com View Post
                                    You can fix those warped prints!.
                                    Never had a warped PLA print, what have you printed that warped?

                                    Comment


                                      #20
                                      It's not sticking to the surface well enough, that's why it curls. Clean your surface good with some acetone weekly and alcohol before every print (clean it after the acetone if you're using nail polish remover as there will be some residue from the nail polish remover).

                                      Comment


                                        #21
                                        I just ordered and received a small roll of PETG.
                                        A little hotter nozzle than PLA, I have it at 210 and the bed at 60. It seemed like it didn't stick well when I tried the bed at 50.
                                        I print on a build sheet not as strong as Build Tak.
                                        So far so good. Still experimenting but I might have a new favorite material here...

                                        Comment

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